Love Without End, Amen – A Tribute for Father’s Day

How would you live life differently if you KNEW you were loved unconditionally?

Unconditional love has the power to change lives.  It is the greatest gift in the world.  People spend their whole lives looking for it.  By it’s very definition, you can’t buy it, you can’t earn it, you can’t do anything to get it.  It’s either given or it’s not.  It’s the one great equalizer in society because everyone wants it and whether you get it has nothing to do with wealth, fame, or power.  In fact, it’s probably the one thing that’s harder to get the more successful you become because you can’t help but wonder if people love you because of who you are or for what you have or who you’ve become.  But God loves us unconditionally, no matter how much we have or don’t have, no matter how much we do or don’t do – God loves us anyway.

Dear friends, let us love one another, for love comes from God. Everyone who loves has been born of God and knows God. Whoever does not love does not know God, because God is love. This is how God showed his love among us: He sent his one and only Son into the world that we might live through him. 10 This is love: not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son as an atoning sacrifice for our sins. 11 Dear friends, since God so loved us, we also ought to love one another. 12 No one has ever seen God; but if we love one another, God lives in us and his love is made complete in us.

19 We love because he first loved us. 20 Whoever claims to love God yet hates a brother or sister is a liar. For whoever does not love their brother and sister, whom they have seen, cannot love God, whom they have not seen. 21 And he has given us this command: Anyone who loves God must also love their brother and sister.

Attending a Tampa Bay Devil Rays ball game during the summer of 2005

We love because he first loved us.

As parents, we experience the kind of love God has for us most strongly with our children.  We feel it right from the moment of their birth. Or even before then.  When Cassie was pregnant with Emma, I used to talk to Emma everyday.  Before bed each night, I’d put my head next to Cassie’s stomach and talk to my little unborn baby girl, telling her about my day, about how I can’t wait for her to come out, and saying “good night.”  Sometimes I’d randomly just go up to Cassie’s stomach and for fun say “Helloooooo in there.”  It was probably a bit embarrassing for Cassie, because I’d do it just sort of whenever I felt like it.  At home, at the mall, in the car – just whenever.  One night, Cassie started getting some unusual pains and we rushed to the hospital, worried that something had gone wrong.  We sat in this cold, sterile intake room waiting for Cassie to get some kind of medical scan done, and I remember holding her hand and just feeling completely helpless.  The worst part was when they wheeled Cassie away.  They wouldn’t even let me go with her and I sat in this little, tiny waiting room all by myself with Law & Order on the television above me.  I remember thinking about how much I already loved my little girl who I hadn’t even seen yet except on some fuzzy sonogram and praying everything would be alright.  I hadn’t felt that anxious ever before.  Thankfully, it was just a scare and about seven months later, Emma would come out just fine, but I felt like just for a moment I had a glimpse of God’s unconditional love for us – that deep love of God that reaches out to us even before we realize we need it.

It’s that kind of love that John is talking about in this letter. 

It’s the love that comes before we even realize we ARE loved.  In Methodism we call this prevenient grace – the unmerited, undeserved, unasked-for love of God that comes before we even know there IS a God.  We call this prevenient grace.  And it’s this unconditional love that motivates God to send Jesus on our behalf.  Not because we had behaved particularly well.  Not because we had done some great deed for God.  But because he knew it was what we needed.  It’s what we do for those we love.  That’s why John writes, “This is love: not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son as an atoning sacrifice for our sins.”  When John tells us that we need to love one another in the same way that God loves us, this is the kind of love he’s talking about – the unconditional, self-sacrificing, put-yourself-out-there kind of love.  We don’t do this because we need to “pay God back” or to balance some kind of cosmic debt.  It isn’t love if it requires payment.  We don’t do it to store up God’s good will.  Again, that isn’t love.  Look at what it says in the Gospel of Luke.  In Luke 6, Jesus tells the crowd to love their enemies.  He says, “If you love those who love you, what credit is that to you?  Even sinners love those who love them.”  It doesn’t take any effort to love those who already love you because you already have an expectation of love in return.  Real love is being able to offer it without any expection, to love the way God loves us.  When we are able to love like that, we have a deeper understanding of God’s love for us.

One of many wonderful Daddy / Daughter Disneyland Days together from back in 2009

Love is essential.  When we are loved, we do better in life.

As a father, there is a unique role we play in the lives of our children and a reason God created us to be fathers in the first place.  It’s not only a duty, but an honor to be a father.  As more and more research is done, it becomes clearer and clearer that fathers are an important part of a child’s development not just because they are a “second parent” but that men specifically interact and behave in ways that help their children become more well-rounded, well-developed people.[1]  Studies have shown that having a loving, involved father increases a child’s chance of getting mostly A’s in school by 43% and are 33% less likely to repeat a grade.  43% more likely to get A’s.  Fathers who play with their children tend to have children with higher IQs “as well as better linguistic and cognitive capabilities.”[2]   Children with involved fathers tend to be more sociable, exhibit better self-control, and tend to be more popular.  They were less likely to lie, experience depression, and more likely to engage in pro-social behavior.  The more we learn about fathers, the more we realize how important they are.  Not that mothers are any less important, but too often in society the job of raising children has fallen on mothers.  The well-being and welfare of a child rests solely on her shoulders when it should be shared by both parents.  Fathers have a deeper responsibility than society gives them credit for or often expects of them, but not less than what God expects.  In Ephesians we hear from Paul that fathers are responsible for bringing up their children in the “training and instruction of the Lord” and are called not to exasperate them.  In the letter to the Colossians, Paul writes that fathers should not embitter their children, or they will become discouraged.  God places upon fathers an expectation of love and encouragement that is important in how they grow up.

Love isn’t just a feeling.  Love is a choice.

We shouldn’t love our children just when we feel like loving them.  We shouldn’t love them only when they deserve it.  We shouldn’t make them earn our love.  We should love them always simply because.  But love is a choice as evidenced by the unfortunate number of fathers out there who are not involved in their children’s lives.  One in three children live in a fatherless household.[3]  48% of those see their children less than once a month.  31% say they don’t even call or email once a month.[4]  We choose what’s important in our lives.  We choose who to love and how to love even if it’s only ourselves.  It is a choice we make moment by moment just as God constantly chooses to love us despite our rebelliousness.  And just as we are loved by God, we must also choose to love our children so that when they explore faith for themselves, they have an idea of what it means to have a loving God in Heaven.  It’s hard to imagine a loving Father above when right here ours is absent.  Love is a choice.  And God chooses to love us everyday.   We must choose to love also.

Hanging out on Father’s Day at the opening to Cars Land 2012

It’s hard to imagine the love of a father can have that much impact on a child’s life.

But it’s true.  Not just academically and socially but in faith as well.  How involved a father is in the faith life of their children influences greatly the future faith of their children as well.  Fathers who go to church regularly have a greater impact on the future of their children being in church than their mothers.  In fact, if a father goes to church regularly with their mother, 75% of their children will still be in church either regularly or irregularly as adults.  If a father doesn’t go to church but the mother does only 39% of their children will go to church at all, with only 2% being regular attenders.[5]  As a father, we have a greater responsibility to our children’s well-being than we often think.  We influence not just their life here, but their eternal life as well.  On this Father’s Day, I want to encourage you to show your unconditional love to the people important in your life.  Encourage, embolden, and love your children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren so that they may know not only your love but the model of love God has for them.

Daddy / Daughter Day in 2017 going to see An American in Paris together

George Strait sang a song that especially touches my heart.

And it speaks directly to this idea of unconditional love that fathers should have for their children.  It’s called “Love Without End, Amen” and in it, he begins by singing about his own rebellious childhood and how he would get into trouble at school.  He prepares this whole speech for his father while he is waiting for his dad to come home and after giving it, he waits for his punishment.  But instead, his father tells him, “Let me tell you a secret about a father’s love.  A secret that my daddy said was just between us.  You see daddies don’t just love their children every now and then.  It’s a love without end, amen.”  When his own child gets in trouble, he decides to share the same words with his own son and passes down to another generation this idea of unconditional love between parent and child.   He says to his son, “Let me tell you a secret about a father’s love.  A secret that my daddy said was just between us.  You see daddies don’t just love their children every now and then.  It’s a love without end, amen.”  And in the middle of the night, he dreams that he’s died and realizes that he has lived a far from perfect life.  He says, “if they know half the things I’ve done they’ll never let me in.  Then somewhere from the other side, I heard these words again, ‘Let me tell you a secret about a father’s love.  A secret that my daddy said was just between us.  You see daddies don’t just love their children every now and then.  It’s a love without end, amen.’”  The unconditional love that we have for our children comes from the unconditional love God has for us.  We must as fathers and grandfathers and parents in general, offer this unconditional love to our kids.  All children deserve to know the love of their father – both here and in Heaven.  In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

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